Drinking Water

All over the world people die from drinking contaminated water. Even that dirty water teeming with germs and bacteria is not easily accessible to them. In Africa alone, people spend 40 billion hours every year walking for water. Women and children usually bear the burden of water collection, walking miles to the nearest source.

Time spent walking and resulting diseases keep them from school, work and taking care of their families. Along their long walk, they're subjected to a greater risk of harassment and sexual assault. With safe water nearby, women are free to pursue new opportunities and improve their families’ lives.

Unfortunately these scenarios are found all over the world under different pretexts. Although it is deemed to be the responsibility of governments to provide basic necessities to people of their countries unfortunately mostly that is not the case.

People die all over the world from drinking this contaminated water fetched with great struggle. This mainly affects children as they are more vulnerable and as their bodies aren't strong enough to fight diarrhoea, dysentery and other such illnesses.

That is why in addition to education UKCAB aims to endow under privileged, under developed and developing areas of the world with basic necessities like clean drinking water. The focus areas chosen are the villages and small towns. We can educate people about clean drinking water, impact of unhygienic drinking water, ways and sources to clean water cost effectively. Our focus in this project driven by the simple and effective motive of transforming lives by improving access to water, hygiene and sanitation.

The aims of this project are

  • Help build a source of clean water like a well so people (particularly in under-developed/developing world don’t have to drink filthy river and/or stagnant rain water that’s teeming with parasites, bacteria and animal waste
  • Put taps and pumps in the heart of a community for easy access
  • End the threat of diseases originate from contaminated water and claims lives of about 2,000 children every day